Tag Archives: Corinthians

The Meaning of Life

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So, here we are. In 2018. Year of the Dog. Holidays over. Everyone back to work tomorrow. I’ve spent the last month listening to Christmas music ad nauseam and watching more Top 10s than I care to admit. Now it’s all about the resolutions. Looking forward and all. Make a pledge, break a pledge, feel better for having tried.

Over the last month I’ve tried to spend my time thinking not of the past or the future but of my place in the present. I know, I know. Soooooo deep (groan…groan again…dry heaving…little chunks in the mouth).

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Regardless, this kind of thinking naturally leads to introspection in many and varied forms. For me it leads to two things: thinking back on past experiences and considering some of the wisest people I’ve read over the years.

With the former, there was much lamentation, guilt, shame, confusion and a whole other bunch of nouns that never make you feel very good. Why would I have…? How could they have…?

Quite simply: Why?

 

With the latter, it brought to mind things like the Socratic paradox (The only thing I know is that I know nothing), Einstein’s famous quip (The more I learn, the more I realize how much I don’t know), the famous Greek aphorism from the Oracle at Delphi (know thyself), and Corinthians (And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love).

I’d also reflect on witty/inspirational/touching things people have said over the ages, some of which I use, for example, in my Quote of the Day posts. But when you’re attempting to find your place in this great big universe, sometimes you feel that what you need are not the wise words of sage thinkers, but a notion of personal worth and self-actualization.

And that, I’m told, comes from within.

 

As we march into a new year and I start my second coffee of the day, I’m not sure if I have any new answers to some of my most pressing questions, but I’m content knowing that I made an effort to better understand myself and my place in the world.

And instead of ending with some pithy quote, I’d like to link to a little-seen YouTube video called, ah-hem, “The Meaning of Life.” It has fewer than 2,000 views. It’s never gone viral. It’s just a little piece of magic in an otherwise endless stream of online videos. For me, however, it always brings a smile to my face because it does something remarkable. It take complexity and makes it simple. Simple = good, right?

On that note, take a couple of minutes to enjoy the sampling below, and may all your hopes, wishes, ambitions, and dreams be realized in 2018.

 

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Quote of the Day

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I’m not a religious man. I don’t secure the buoy of my spiritual beliefs to any monotheistic faith, though I do believe in faith. And hope. And, of course, love.

While not a Christian, I value strong writing/storytelling as much as anyone (bonus points for great translations from obscure languages), no matter what banner it falls under or what stigmatism might be attached to it, and the Bible certainly has its fair share of inspiring, meaningful and beautifully crafted passages.

Among the most famous and well-known of these would certainly have to be 1 Corinthians 13, the chapter focused on what is most commonly translated today as “love,” and authored by Paul the Apostle and Sosthenes. Parts of the thirteenth chapter of the First Epistle to the Coronthians in the New Testament have been quoted innumerable times by politicians, artists, activists, religious leaders, parents, teachers and Christians the world over, but one of my favourite recitals of the tremendously moving words came from Robert De Nero in Roland Jofee’s masterpiece, The Mission.

I’m cheating today by (1) cutting part of the original text and (2) including quotes (plural), but this one certainly warrants it in my opinion.

4 Love suffers long and is kind; love does not envy; love does not parade itself, is not puffed up; 5 does not behave rudely, does not seek its own, is not provoked, thinks no evil; 6 does not rejoice in iniquity, but rejoices in the truth; 7 bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.

11 When I was a child, I spoke as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child; but when I became a man, I put away childish things.

13 And now abide faith, hope, love, these three; but the greatest of these is love.

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